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Quarterly News for California Building Departments

Issue #52, Oct - Dec 2016

It’s Time to Adopt the 2016 California Codes

Webinar Provides Great Guidance

January 1, 2017 has been established as the enforcement date for the 2016 California Codes (known generically as the Title 24 Building Regulations). The California Building Standards Commission (CBSC) has an abundance of helpful information concerning the new codes, as well as the local code adoption process, on www.bsc.ca.gov. Of particular assistance for local jurisdictions is a webinar presented by Stuart Tom, former Building Official and current Fire Marshal for the City of Glendale, California, also a member of the Board of Directors for the International Code Council. The one-hour California Code Adoption for Local Jurisdictions Webinar is available on YouTube.

The webinar discusses local code adoption timelines as well as the need to make findings to support any local amendments made to the state codes. The following are just a few of the items discussed.

  • The 2016 California codes are to be adopted within 180 days of the publication date (July 1, 2016).
  • The earliest enforcement date for the 2016 California codes is January 1, 2017.
  • If the 2016 California codes are not adopted, then the jurisdiction must enforce the 2016 California codes as published, without local amendments.
  • In order to complete the code adoption process before the January 1, 2017 enforcement date, most jurisdictions should plan to get the first reading of the adoption ordinance to their City Council (or County Board of Supervisors) no later than mid November 2016.
  • Code amendments which are administrative in nature do not need to be supported with findings; however, non-administrative amendments must be supported by local findings which are based on local geologic, topographic, or climatic factors.
  • Local amendments need to be presented to the local City Council (or County Board of Supervisors) as part of the adoption process, typically by way of a Resolution which makes the findings to support the need for the amendments.
  • Local amendments are required to be filed with the California Building Standards Commission, as well as with other State agencies in some cases.
  • There is a NEW CODE that jurisdictions must adopt with the 2016 California codes. The California Existing Building Code (CEBC) is a separate code, in a separate code binder. Previously, the Existing Building provisions were contained in Chapter 34 of the 2013 California Building Code. Chapter 34 of the Building Code no longer contains regulations addressing existing buildings. Instead, a new code book, the 2016 California Existing Building Code, will need to be included in the adoption ordinance.

Watching this webinar is highly recommended to make certain that your adoption process is in compliance with all the applicable state statutes. Stuart Tom has done an outstanding job explaining the process and is to be commended for his efforts.

Woodland office building
Cannery Restaurant
Placer County Resource Center
Ritz
Office Complex
Yuba County mall

Focus on the Codes

A New Tool for Your Tool Box (Part 3 of a Series)

code books

By Dan Chudy, PhD, CBO, LEED AP, CASp
Principal Project Manager – Willdan Engineering

architectural house drawing

After a full 360 days of retirement, I decided to get back to work. I had spent 24 years as a Building Official and 6 years as a Building Inspector/Plans Examiner and came to the realization that I needed some brushing-up on the codes if I was going to get back into the inspection business. As a Building Inspector, back in the 1980’s, I had learned the value of having a certain inspection routine and the challenges of trying to memorize all of the codes. Those same challenges are experienced by Plans Examiners as they thumb through hundreds of pages of code to find that certain code section which is applicable to the scenario drawn on the plans. After dusting off my code books and beginning to study, I realized that there was a more logical way (at least for me) to organize and consolidate the most common residential code requirements by segregating them according to which room in the house they applied. The result was an abbreviated listing of hundreds of code provisions grouped according to the room or area in a dwelling to which they related.

The complete list is much too large to publish in a single newsletter article; therefore, this article is being continued in subsequent newsletters as we move through a typical home, from A (Attic) to U (Utility Room). This edition (#52) continues down the alphabet, from “E” (Entry) to “K” (Kitchen), including everything in between.

The Focus on the Codes page presents a running compilation of the published provisions.

Please understand that this effort is a work in progress and I make no claim that the list is all inclusive nor that it is without error. If any errors or omissions are found, please email me so that the list can be improved.

CODE PROVISIONS SEGREGATED ALPHABETICALLY BY SPECIFIC ROOMS IN DWELLINGS

Click the + next to each title to view its description, or click the "Show All" button.

ENTRY & FOYER (including Exit Doors)

  1. CRC R308.4.3 – Window glass with bottom edge less than 18” above floor and top edge more than 36” above floor and more than 9 sq. ft. in area required to be safety glass
  2. CRC R311.2 – Every dwelling shall have at least (1) side-hinged exit door with a minimum 32” clear width by 78” clear height opening (measured with door open 90 degrees)
  3. CRC R311.3 – Landings at exterior doors to be 36” deep in direction of exit travel, the width of the door served, 7.75” max step down (from top of threshold to landing) provided that the door does NOT swing over the landing. Otherwise, 1.5” max from top of threshold when door swings over landing.
  4. CRC R312.2.1 – When fall from window would be more that 72” to surface below, window sill to be 24” min. above floor OR, if less than 24” above floor, window opening shall not allow the passage of a 4” diameter sphere.
  5. CRC R313.3.1.1 Exception 4 – AFES not required in unheated entry areas adjacent to an exterior door
  1. NEC – 210.12 – Arc-fault circuit interrupter required for outlets in all rooms of house that are not protected by GFCI (with a few exceptions for dedicated circuits)
  2. NEC 210.52(H) – Hallways 10’ long or more shall have at least (1) receptacle outlet.
  3. NEC 210.52(I) – Foyers which are NOT a part of a hallway and more than 60 square feet in area shall have at least (1) receptacle on each wall that is more than 3’ long.
  4. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  5. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  6. NEC 210.52(E)(1) – at least 1 exterior receptacle outlet required at front and 1 at rear of house
  7. NEC 406.9 (A) & (B) – Outdoor receptacle outlets to be weatherproof covered with the chord/plug in if in wet location (w/o plug in if in damp location). Damp location is protected from rain by roof (i.e. under patio cover)
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – All other rooms (excluding kitchen, laundry, garage, utility, bathroom) to have either high-efficacy light fixtures OR controlled by a dimmer or vacancy sensor

FRONT ROOM OR LIVING ROOM

  1. SCAQMD Rule 445 – Applicable to portions of Southern California. Wood burning fireplaces NOT permitted in new construction (except if above 3,000 in elevation or no infrastructure for natural gas service within 150’ of property). Rule applies to all permanently installed indoor and outdoor wood burning fireplaces or fire pits.
  2. CRC R303.1 - All habitable rooms shall have an aggregate glazing area of not less than 8 percent of the floor area, and an openable window area to the outdoors of at least 4 percent for ventilation
  3. CRC R308.4.3 – Window glass less than 18” above floor MAY be required to be safety glass (see code)
  4. CRC R312.2.1 – When fall from window would be more that 72” to surface below, window sill to be 24” min. above floor OR, if less than 24” above floor, window opening shall not allow the passage of a 4” diameter sphere.
  1. NEC – 210.12 – Arc-fault circuit interrupter required for outlets in all rooms of house that are not protected by GFCI (with a few exceptions for dedicated circuits)
  2. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  3. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – All other rooms (excluding kitchen, laundry, garage, utility, bathroom) to have either high-efficacy light fixtures OR controlled by a dimmer or vacancy sensor

GARAGE

  1. CRC R302.1 #4 – Detached garages w/in 2’ of PL are limited to 4” max eave projections
  2. CRC R302.5 – openings and penetration protection between garage and house
  3. CRC R302.5.2 - Ducts in the garage and ducts penetrating the walls or ceilings separating the dwelling from the garage shall be constructed of a minimum No. 26 gage (0.48mm) sheet steel or other approved material and shall have no openings into the garage
  4. CRC R302.5.3 – pipe, vent, duct and wire penetrations of the garage firewall need not be sealed with a listed firestop CRC R302.5.1 – no openings into sleeping rooms
  5. CRC R309.1 – floor to slope to a drain or toward vehicle doorway, noncombustible floor required
  6. CRC R302.5.1 – requirements for doors between house and garage:
  7. w/o AFES w/AFES
    Solid wood or steel or 20 minute rated 1‑3/8” No specified type or thickness
    Self-closing & self-latching Self-closing & self-latching
  8. CRC Table R302.6 – ½” gyp board between house and garage – 5/8” on ceiling if habitable space above, ½” on exterior wall (detached garage) when less than 3’ to dwelling. See also R302.1 #2
  9. CRC R309.5 – Zero lot line subdivision garages to be provided with quick-response AFES
  10. CRC R309.5 – garage door NOT considered an obstruction to AFES sprinkler heads
  11. CRC R309.6 – AFES required in attached garages and carports with habitable space above
  12. CRC R311.1 – Required exit can NOT pass through the garage
  13. CRC R311.3.1 Exception - landing or floor on the exterior side shall not be more than 7-3/4 inches below the top of the threshold provided the door does not swing over the landing or floor.
  14. CRC R311.7.6 Exception – landing not required at top of stairs from garage to house provided door does not swing over stairs.
  15. CBC 1607.1, footnote a - Structural members of garage/carport floor system shall be design to support a 3,000 lbs. point load.
  1. CPC 507.13 - Water heater burner element to be 18” above garage floor
  2. CPC 507.13.1 – Water heater or other appliance to be protected from physical damage if in path of vehicle
  1. CMC 308.1.1 - Water heater / furnace in garage will be protected from automobile damage by being installed behind protective barriers or by being elevated or located out of the normal path of vehicles.
  1. NEC 210.8 – GFCI outlets required in garages (ALL receptacle outlets in garage – including garage door opener –changed in 2008)
  2. NEC 210.52 (G) – Basements and attached garages to have at least (1) receptacle outlet (detached garages and accessory building without electrical power are exempt)
  3. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  4. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  5. NEC 334.15(B) – Any exposed romex that is subject to physical damage must be in conduit (AHJ to determine if romex above 8’ is subject to physical damage in garage)
  6. Cal Green Code 4.106.4.1 – 1” conduit from main electrical panel to a box or enclosure in the garage for future electric vehicle charger circuit. (NO wiring or overcurrent device is required to be installed until the charger unit is installed)
  7. Cal Green Code 4.106.4.1.1 – Electrical service or subpanel to be labeled “EV Capable” at the reserved 40 amp circuit. Also required to label the termination box or enclosure as “EV Capable”.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Garage, Laundry, and Utility Rooms to have high-efficacy light fixtures AND controlled by a vacancy sensor (Detached garage or storage buildings less than 1000 sq. ft. are EXEMPT)\
  2. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Outdoor lighting must be high-efficacy OR have motion sensor plus photocontrol or astronomical time clock AND a manual On/Off switch that does not override the automatic controls.

HABITABLE SPACE

  1. CRC R202 – bathrooms, toilet rooms, closets, halls, storage, utility spaces NOT considered habitable.
  2. CRC R303.1 - All habitable rooms shall have an aggregate glazing area of not less than 8 percent of the floor area, and an openable window area to the outdoors of at least 4 percent for ventilation
  3. CRC R305.1 – minimum ceiling height 7’-0”
  4. CRC R308.4.3 – Window glass less than 18” above floor MAY be required to be safety glass (see code)
  5. CRC R312.2.1 – When fall from window would be more that 72” to surface below, window sill to be 24” min. above floor OR, if less than 24” above floor, window opening shall not allow the passage of a 4” diameter sphere.
  1. NEC – 210.12 – Arc-fault circuit interrupter required for outlets in all rooms of house that are not protected by GFCI (with a few exceptions for dedicated circuits)
  2. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  3. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – All other rooms (excluding kitchen, laundry, garage, utility, bathroom) to have either high-efficacy light fixtures OR controlled by a dimmer or vacancy sensor

HALLWAY

  1. CRC R305.1 – minimum ceiling height 7’-0”
  2. CRC R311.6 – minimum width 36” CRC R312.2.1 – When fall from window would be more that 72” to surface below, window sill to be 24” min. above floor OR, if less than 24” above floor, window opening shall not allow the passage of a 4” diameter sphere.
  3. CRC R314.3 – Smoke alarms required outside bedrooms (in the immediate vicinity)
  4. CRC R314.3.4 (6) – Smoke alarms required to be at least 3’ from supply registers
  5. CRC R315.1.4 – Carbon monoxide alarms required to be at outside each sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms and one on every level, including basements.
  1. NEC – 210.12 – Arc-fault circuit interrupter required for outlets in all rooms of house that are not protected by GFCI (with a few exceptions for dedicated circuits)
  2. NEC 210.52 (H) – hallways more than 10’ long require at least (1) receptacle outlet (the general rule of 12’ spacing is not applicable to hallways)
  3. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  4. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – All other rooms (excluding kitchen, laundry, garage, utility, bathroom) to have either high-efficacy light fixtures OR controlled by a dimmer or vacancy sensor

KITCHEN

  1. CRC R303.1 - All habitable rooms shall have an aggregate glazing area of not less than 8 percent of the floor area, and an openable window area to the outdoors of at least 4 percent for ventilation
  2. CRC R304.2 – Kitchens are exempt from minimum floor area and minimum dimension requirements.
  3. CRC R306.4 – hot and cold water required to sink
  4. CRC R312.2.1 – When fall from window would be more that 72” to surface below, window sill to be 24” min. above floor OR, if less than 24” above floor, window opening shall not allow the passage of a 4” diameter sphere.
  5. CRC R314.3.4 – Smoke alarms required to be minimum 20’ from permanent cooking equipment (10’ if ionization type alarm equipped with silencing switch or photoelectric type alarm)
  1. CGC 4.303.1 – Kitchen faucets: 1.8 gal (SB 407:2.2 gal max) (Note: SB 407, aka: California Civil Code 1101, requires some additions and alterations to retrofit existing noncompliant water fixtures to meet current water saving standards. Noncompliant is defined as a Kitchen faucet greater than 2.2 gal/min flow rate
  1. NEC 210.8 – GFCI outlets required for all counter top outlets and within 6’ of sinks not in kitchens
  2. NEC 210.8(A) & 210.12(A) – Dish washer and garbage disposal circuits do NOT require AFCI or GFCI protection or Tamper Resistant plugs
  3. NEC 210.11 (C) – Two 20 amp small appliance branch circuits required for kitchens and dining rooms
  4. NEC 210.52 (B) – countertop spacing: 12” or wider countertop to be at least (1), no more than 24” from any point along the countertop wall to an outlet (i.e. 4’ between), islands or peninsular countertops more than 24” to have (1),
  5. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CMC 314.3 – Return air shall not be taken from bathrooms, kitchens, closets
  2. CMC T403.7 – Kitchen fan required: 100 cfm if intermittent or 50 cfm if continuous and 3 sone max sound level
  3. CMC 504.2 - Domestic kitchen downdraft grill-range ventilation installed under a concrete slab floor may be of approved Schedule 40 PVC
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Kitchen to have at least 50% high-efficacy lighting (Exhaust hood lights and lights inside cabinets are EXEMPT)
  2. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Recessed can lights insulation contact (IC) listed and certified air tight (AT) (IC/AT)
  3. CEC Pipe Insulation Mandatory Measure (150.0(j)2)) – R4 (1”) pipe insulation required on all HOT water pipes ¾” or larger to point of use and all HOT water pipes (regardless of size) to kitchen fixtures.

Intersystem Bonded Terminals rEQUIRED

By Dan Chudy, PhD, CBO, LEED AP, CASp

Over the past year, as I have been inspecting numerous installations of both new residential electrical service panels and upgraded residential electrical service panels (usually as a result of Solar Photovoltaic Systems), I have noticed that some contractors are not installing the Intersystem Bonding Terminal as required by 2013 NEC 250.94.

This code requirement was introduced in the 2010 Edition of the California Electrical Code (based on the 2008 National Electrical Code) and is titled: “Bonding of Other Systems”. The “other systems” are typically telephone systems, cable TV systems, and the like. These “other systems” historically experienced difficulty obtaining a good bond to the existing electrical system, and some of their bonding devices actually interfered with the ability for the panel door to open and close properly. Therefore, the code writers decided that it was time to provide a universal bonding terminal for these other systems to obtain a good bond and eliminate the need for the add-on bonding terminals that interfered with the panel doors.

IBT cover and no cover

An example of the type of bonding termination device used by some cable TV installers which should be replaced by newer Intersystem Bonding Termination devices.

There are several listed Intersystem Bonding Termination devices available. The photo captioned "New device and cover" shows the same Intersystem Bonding Termination device with and without the plastic cover.

Another type of Intersystem Bonding Termination device actually attaches to the electrical panel, with the Grounding Electrode Conductor passing through the center.

IBT cover and no cover

New device and cover

Device attaches to panel

LEGISLATIVE REVIEW

For a list of legislative actions which may have an impact on local building departments, visit the CALBO Legislative Watch page.

Legislation of Interest: CASp Bill Defeated

senate desks

CALBO was heavily involved with the defeat of Assembly Bill 2873 (Thurmond): Certified Access Specialists. The bill originally required all building inspectors to become CASp certified by January 1, 2017 and increased business license fees to be deposited into the Disability and Education Revolving Fund. 

CALBO worked tirelessly to find a workable solution to the issues AB 2873 attempted to solve, but in the end, no reasonable solution existed.

This is a significant accomplishment for California's building department professionals. From the inception of AB 2873, CALBO worked closely with the California Building Industry Association and with the California Business Properties Association to bring forth the industry's voice. CALBO expanded its coalition approach by joining forces with the League of California Cities, County Building Officials Association of California, and California Association of Professional Employees to show the Senate that strong opposition remained. CALBO asked its members to step forward, and they did! Together, CALBO members, leadership, staff and industry partners brought forth a unified voice and it made the difference. 

For a list of legislative actions which may have an impact on local building departments, visit the CALBO Legislative Watch page.

DSA Academy Accessibility and Certified Access Specialist Classes

The Division of the State Architect (DSA) develops building standards related to access compliance, and administers the Certified Access Specialist (CASp) examination and program. 

DSA is mandated to provide training specific to access compliance; these one-day classes are offered through the DSA Academy.

If you are interested in developing your knowledge and skills related to access compliance and the CASp program in order to:

  • Meet the requirements for continuing education to renew your architect’s license,
  • Improve the quality of construction documents to limit liability for you and your client,
  • Become a Certified Access Specialist to add to the services you can provide,
  • Understand your responsibilities when providing CASp services,
  • Increase your knowledge of the various codes and standards regulating accessibility,
  • Improve the quality of plan review and inspections,

– DSA Academy Accessibility and CASp classes are for you!

DSA Academy Class Catalog is available online with the various course descriptions. The locations and dates are posted on the 2016 Calendar of Classes.

Individuals can register for any of the classes offered by DSA. When you register for all four days of the accessibility classes the fourth day is free. The CASp 101 classes are not included in this offer.

The repeat of a paid course within a three year period is eligible for additional CEU credit if updates to standards or regulations have occurred between class offerings or if a CASp attends each offering of the class in-person because interaction with the instructor and attendees offers a different class experience. 

For CALBO chapters, consider hosting an academy class for your members.

For more information, or to discuss hosting classes for your members, contact:

Accessibility Classes Certified Access Specialist Classes
Susan R. Moe Ida Clair
Senior Architect, CASp Senior Architect, CASp
(916) 323-1687 (916) 322-2490
susan.moe@dgs.ca.gov ida.clair@dgs.ca.gov

DSA Academy Accessibility and Certified Access Specialist Class Course Descriptions

CASp 101: Certification and Practice
This class highlights significant changes to the DSA Certified Access Specialist (CASp) Program, with information relevant to the CASp, candidates interested in seeking certification, or individuals who want to find out more about the CASp program. Classes have been updated to include an explanation of new statutory and regulatory requirements.

Accessibility Classes
Plan Review – Access
This course equips participants with essential concepts, reference materials and job aides for conducting timely, consistent and accurate plan review for access compliance. The course is oriented to Chapter 11B of the 2013 California Building Code.

Access Compliance – 2013 and 2016 California Building Code
This course highlights access provisions in Chapter 11B of the 2013 California Building Code including the Intervening Code Adoption Cycle Supplement and the 2016 California Building Code approved by the Building Standards Commission in January 2016.

Transient Lodging, Housing at a Place of Education and Social Service Center Establishments
This course provides the participant an overview of Federal and State regulations with the main emphasis on Chapter 11B of the 2013 California Building Code for accessible transient lodging, housing at a place of education and social service establishments both public and private.

Accessible Public Housing Regulations, Standards and Guidelines
This course provides the participant an overview of Federal and State regulations with the main emphasis on Chapter 11B of the 2013 California Building Code for accessible public housing.

CALBO Training Events, So. California

2016 CALBO Education Week: Ontario

Monday, October 24 -
Thursday, October 27, 2016

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Ontario Airport
222 North Vineyard Avenue
Ontario, CA 91764

Register by: Tuesday, October 11, 2016

2016 CALBO Education Week: Anaheim

Monday, November 7 -
Thursday, November 10, 2016

Anaheim Marriott
700 Convention Center Way
Anaheim, CA 92801

Register by: Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Questions about the 2016 CALBO Education Weeks?

Contact CALBO at 916-457-1103 or info@calbo.org.