intro

Quarterly News for California Building Departments

Issue #51, July - September 2016

Energy Code Training

California's Energy code has recently been updated, with changes that will become mandatory in January 2017.

Now's the time to discover the new requirements, to ensure you're not caught by surprise in the new year. As California moves toward mandatory Zero Net Energy for new construction, the code continues to include strict new requirements. 

By HOK (HOK) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Net Zero Court, zero emissions building prototype in St. Louis, MO. By HOK [CC BY 3.0]

"2016 Building Efficiency Standards" Green Technology training covers updated Title 24 standards for residential and non-residential buildings, from high performance walls and attics to lighting and lighting controls. It will also review challenges that have resulted in implementing the 2103 standards, strategies for addressing them, and solutions to these challenges that may be included in the recent revisions. 

This training offers 5 AIA HSW CEUs and .5 ICC CEUs.

Register for upcoming dates and locations:

Contact Cindy Dangberg, Director of Registration at Green Technology at 626.577.5700 if you have any questions, or if you would like information about group discounts.

Tracy City Hall
Cavallo
CSU Channel Islands
CSU Stanislaus Science Building
CSU San Jose library
CSUMB library

Pictured: A few buildings plan-checked or inspected by Willdan

Focus on the Codes

A New Tool for Your Tool Box (Part 2 of a Series)

code books

By Dan Chudy, Ph.D., CBO, LEED AP, CASp
Principal Project Manager – Willdan Engineering

architectural house drawing

After a full 360 days of retirement, I decided to get back to work. I had spent 24 years as a Building Official and 6 years as a Building Inspector/Plans Examiner and came to the realization that I needed some brushing-up on the codes if I was going to get back into the inspection business. As a Building Inspector, back in the 1980’s, I had learned the value of having a certain inspection routine and the challenges of trying to memorize all of the codes. Those same challenges are experienced by Plans Examiners as they thumb through hundreds of pages of code to find that certain code section which is applicable to the scenario drawn on the plans. After dusting off my code books and beginning to study, I realized that there was a more logical way (at least for me) to organize and consolidate the most common residential code requirements by segregating them according to which room in the house they applied. The result was an abbreviated listing of hundreds of code provisions grouped according to the room or area in a dwelling to which they related.

The complete list is much too large to publish in a single newsletter article; therefore, this article will be continued in subsequent newsletters as we move through a typical home, from A (Attic) to U (Utility Room). The April 2016 edition of the Willdan Letter (#50) contained code requirements applicable to Attics and Basements; this edition (#51) continues down the alphabet, from “B” (Bathroom) to “D” (Deck), including everything in between.

We'll consolidate the published provisions under the "Focus on the Codes" tab.

Please understand that this effort is a work in progress and I make no claim that the list is all inclusive nor that it is without error. If any errors or omissions are found, please email me at so that the list can be improved.

CODE PROVISIONS SEGREGATED ALPHABETICALLY BY SPECIFIC ROOMS IN DWELLINGS

Click the + next to each title to view its description, or click the "Show All" button.

BATHROOM

  1. CRC R303.3 – 3 sq. ft. minimum glazing or 50 cfm exhaust (w/humidistat if tub or shower)(see other more restrictive regulations in the Energy code and Mechanical code)
  2. CRC R305.1 Ex #2 – 6’-8” min. head clearance at center front of fixtures
  3. CRC R305.1 Ex #2 – 6’-8” min. head clearance at shower above 30”X30” area
  4. CRC R305.1 – min. ceiling height 7’-0”
  5. CRC R306.4 – hot and cold water required to lavatories, bath tubs, showers
  6. CRC R307.2 – nonabsorbent wall finish to a height of 6’ above floor at shower or tub with shower head
  7. CRC R308.4.5 – Glazing less than 60” above the standing surface of the tub or shower to be safety glass
  8. CRC R313.3.1.1 Exception 3 – AFES not required in bathrooms of 55 sf or less in area
  9. CRC R314.3.4 (5) – Smoke alarms required to be at least 3’ from bathroom (with tub or shower) doors unless it can’t be reasonably located elsewhere 
  10. CBC 1013.8 – Window guard requirements apply if window sill is 36” or less above floor and fall would be more than 72”
  1. CGC 4.303.1 – Toilets: 1.28 gal., Urinals: 0.5 gal., Shower heads: 2.0 gal., Lavatory: 1.5 gal. max – 0.8 gal. min. (Note: California Civil Code 1101 requires some additions and alterations to retrofit existing noncompliant water fixtures to meet current water saving standards. Noncompliant is defined as fixtures exceeding the following ratings: Toilets – 1.6 gal, Urinals – 1 gal, Shower heads = 2.5 gal, Lavs = 2.2 gal, Kitchen faucet = 2.2 gal)
  2. CGC 4.506 (&CBC R303.3.1) – Bathrooms with tubs or showers to have Energy Star exhaust fans vented to outside the building and controlled by a humidistat (also 50 CFM min. per CMC T403.7 and 3 sone max per T-24 150.0(a) & 150.2(a))
  1. CPC 402.5 – Water closet to be set at least 15” from center to side wall or side obstructions and 24” min. clear space in front of toilet.
  2. CPC 402.5 - Urinals to be set at least 12” from center to side wall or side obstructions
  3. CPC 408.6 – Shower compartments shall have a minimum finished interior space of 1024 square inches and capable of encompassing a 30” diameter circle to a height of 70” above the drain.
  4. CPC 504.1 – Water heaters in bathrooms or bedrooms can’t take combustion air from those rooms and must have gasketed self-closing doors
  1. NEC 210.8 – GFCI outlets required in bathrooms
  2. NEC 210.12(C)(3) – At least (1) 20 amp branch circuit is required in bathroom – no other outlets allowed on this circuit.
  3. NEC 210.52(A) – General convenience receptacle outlet requirements (12’ spacing) NOT applicable in bathrooms.
  4. NEC 210.52 (D) – outlet to be within 3’ of basin rim
  5. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every bathroom
  6. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  7. NEC 410.10(D) – Lights over tub/shower can’t be pendant type or hanging or ceiling fan and must be 3’ horizontally and 8’ vertically from tub or shower overflow rim. Fixed type light fixtures that are 8’ or less above the tub or shower overflow rim and within the tub or shower area must be listed for use in damp location or wet location if subject to shower spray
  8. NEC 690.14(C)(1) – PV disconnect shall not be installed in bathrooms.
  1. CMC 314.3 – Return air shall not be taken from bathrooms, kitchens, closets
  2. CMC T403.7 – 50 CFM min. ventilation required in all bathrooms (rooms with tub, shower, spa, etc.)
  3. CPC 303.3 – All bathrooms, water closet compartments, and similar rooms require 3 sq. ft. min window (1/2 openable) OR mechanical ventilation (Green Code and T-24 are more restrictive and require ventilation even if there is a window: 50 CFM min and 3 sone max per T-24 150.0(a) & 150.2(a))
  4. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Exhaust fans to be switched separately from lights
  5. CMC 902.2 – Fuel burning appliances shall not be installed in bedroom or bathroom unless room size is at least 50 cubic feet of area for every 1000 BTU/h of the name plate rating of the dryer OR combustion air must be provided to the space from other areas.
  6. CMC 908.1 – Vented gas fireplaces shall not be installed in bedrooms or bathrooms unless listed and the room has adequate volume (see CMC 701.4 and 902.2)
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Bathrooms to have at least (1) high-efficacy light fixture AND all other bathroom lights to be high-efficacy or controlled by a vacancy sensor
  2. CEC Pipe Insulation Mandatory Measure (150.0(j)2)) – R4 (1”) pipe insulation required on all HOT water pipes ¾” or larger to point of use and all HOT water pipes (regardless of size) to kitchen fixtures. Also first 5’ of hot and cold water pipes at the water heater. Pipe insulation NOT required at framing penetrations. Pipe in insulated wall cavity is acceptable ONLY if Quality Insulation Installation standards (HERS verification) are met. Pipe in attic is exempt IF buried by at least 4” blown insulation. Insulation to be 4” min from water heater flue. Hot and cold water lines should be at least 2” apart.
  3. CEC 150.0(a) & 150.2(a) – (ASHRAE 62.2) – Exhaust fans: 50 cfm min and 3 sone max sound level

BEDROOM

  1. CRC R304.2 and .3– minimum room area 70 sq. ft. and minimum dimension of 7’
  2. CRC R308.4.3 – Window glass less than 18” above floor MAY be required to be safety glass (see code)
  3. CRC R310 – Egress windows: 44” sill, 5.0 sq. ft. (first floor) or 5.7 sq. ft. (above first floor), 20” wide, 24” tall. For openings into patios, see R303.8.1, R303.1 Ex#3, R303.2
  4. CRC R310.4 – Bars over egress windows allowed IF they don’t obstruct required opening size and openable from the inside without key or special knowledge or greater force than window (the Fire dept can (may) require approved exterior release for their use in emergencies)
  5. CBC 1013.8 – Window guard requirements apply if window sill is 36” or less above floor and fall would be more than 72”
  1. CRC R314.3 – Smoke alarms required in bedrooms (see also H & S Code 13113.7)
  2. CRC R314.3.4 (4) - Smoke alarm required to be at least 20’ horizontally from cooking appliances (unless Ionization or Photoelectric type alarm – which is 10’ min.)
  3. CRC R314.3.4 (5) - Smoke alarm required to be at least 3’ horizontally from bathroom doors
  4. CRC R314.3.4 (6) – Smoke alarms required to be at least 3’ from supply registers
  5. CRC R314.3.4 (7) – Smoke alarms required to be at least 3’ from tip of ceiling fan blades
  6. CRC R314.3.3 – 10 year battery only required on smoke alarms if they are the battery only type (not hard wired)
  7. CRC R314.5 – Smoke alarms to be interconnected
  8. CRC R315.1 – CO alarms NOT required if no fuel-burning appliance and no attached garage
  9. CRC R315.1.2 – CO alarms to be hard wired with battery backup.
  10. CRC R315.1.3 – CO alarms to be interconnected when more than 1 unit installed
  11. CRC R315.1.4 (6) – Carbon monoxide alarms required to be outside each sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms and on every level of the dwelling (see also H & S Code 17926)
  12. CRC R315.2.4 – In existing dwellings where alteration do not result in the removal of wall or ceiling finishes a battery only or plug-in CO alarm may be used
  1. CPC 504.1 – Water heaters in bathrooms or bedrooms can’t take combustion air from those rooms and must have gasketed self-closing doors
  1. NEC – 210.12 – Arc-fault circuit interrupter required for outlets in all rooms of house that are not protected by GFCI (with a few exceptions for dedicated circuits)
  2. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room (i.e. bedrooms)
  3. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CMC 902.2 and 701.4.1 – Fuel burning appliances shall not be installed in bedroom or bathroom unless room size is at least 50 cubic feet of area for every 1000 BTU/h of the name plate rating of the dryer OR combustion air must be provided to the space from other areas.
  2. CMC 908.1 – Vented gas fireplaces shall not be installed in bedrooms or bathrooms unless listed and the room has adequate volume (see CMC 701.4.1 and 902.2). Except direct vent gas fireplaces.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – All rooms (excluding kitchen, laundry, garage, utility, bathroom) to have either high-efficacy light fixtures OR controlled by a dimmer or vacancy sensor

CARPORT

  1. CRC R309.2 –asphalt floor OK, floor to be sloped to a drain or toward vehicle doorway
  2. CRC R309.2 – minimum 2 sides open
  3. CRC 309.2 – carport NOT open on 2 or more sides is considered a garage
  4. CRC R302.6 – no separation required between carport and house
  5. CRC Table R302.6 –5/8” on ceiling if habitable space above
  6. CRC R309.6 – AFES required in attached garages, and carports with habitable space above
  7. CRC R313.3.1.1 Exception 4 – AFES not required in detached garages, and carports with no habitable space above
  1. NEC 210.8 – GFCI outlets required in carport and similar areas
  2. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  3. NEC 406.9 (A) & (B) – Outdoor receptacle outlets to be weatherproof covered with the chord/plug in if in wet location (w/o plug in if in damp location). Damp location is protected from rain by roof (i.e. under patio cover)
  4. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  5. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Outdoor lighting must be high-efficacy OR have motion sensor plus photocontrol or astronomical time clock AND a manual On/Off switch that does not override the automatic controls.

CLOSET

  1. CRC R313.3.1.1 Exception 2 – AFES not required in closets, pantries, etc. which do not exceed 24 sq. ft. in area, with the smallest dimension not greater than 3’
  1. NEC – 210.12 – Arc-fault circuit interrupter required for outlets in all rooms of house that are not protected by GFCI (with a few exceptions for dedicated circuits)
  2. NEC 210.52 – closets are exempt from the general convenience outlet requirements (12’ spacing)
  3. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  4. NEC 410.16 – Lights in closets: fluorescent = 6” from shelf, LED or incandescent = 12” from shelf with some exceptions for LED (see Energy Code requirement for High Efficacy lighting)
  1. CMC 314.3 – Return air shall not be taken from bathrooms, kitchens, closets
  2. CMC 701.6 – Mechanical closet outdoor combustion air opening requirements
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – All rooms (excluding kitchen, laundry, garage, utility, bathroom) to have either high-efficacy light fixtures OR controlled by a dimmer or vacancy sensor

DECK / BALCONY

  1. CRC R105.1 #10 – Exempt from Permit if less than or equal to 200 sf and 30” or less above grade and not attached to a dwelling and don’t serve exit door
  2. CRC R303.8 Ex #3 – If required glazed openings is under a deck, it requires 3’ min vertical clear opening
  3. CRC R311.5 – positive anchorage to primary structure (NO toe nails or nails in withdrawal)
  4. CRC R507.1 – Decks cannot use nails in withdrawal or toenails for the attachment to the house
  1. NEC 210.8 – GFCI outlets required outdoors
  2. NEC 210.52 (E)(3) – Balconies, decks and porches to have at least one receptacle outlet
  3. NEC 210.70 (A) – at least (1) wall switched light outlet required in every habitable room and bathroom and hallway, stairway, garage, exterior side of outdoor grade level entrances (garage vehicle doors are exempt)
  4. NEC 406.9 (A) & (B) – Outdoor receptacle outlets to be weatherproof covered with the chord/plug in if in wet location (w/o plug in if in damp location). Damp location is protected from rain by roof (i.e. under patio cover)
  5. NEC 406.12 – Tamper resistant receptacle outlets for all non-locking 120V/15 & 20 Amp outlets unless for dedicated appliance or luminaries or over 5.5’ above floor.
  1. CEC Lighting Mandatory Measures (150.0(k)) – Outdoor lighting must be high-efficacy OR have motion sensor plus photocontrol or astronomical time clock AND a manual On/Off switch that does not override the automatic controls.

Mandatory Recycled Water Systems in Newly Constructed Dwellings

recycled water icon

AB 2282, approved by Governor Brown in 2014, required that the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) develop mandatory building standards for the installation of recycled water systems in newly constructed single-family and multifamily residential buildings. In an effort to develop those standards, a group of stakeholders has been brought together to begin discussions. At the conclusion of HCD’s research and development of these new building standards, the proposed regulations will be submitted to the Building Standard Commission for adoption into the next California Building Code.

Interested parties are encouraged to keep an eye on these proposed regulations as they develop because the outcome will be another local building department enforcement task. Materials concerning this Assembly Bill and its progress are posted on this CBSC calendar.

For questions, please contact CBSC Technical Staff at (916) 263-0916.

Water Hammer Arresters in Dwellings – Required or Not?

By Dan Chudy, Ph.D., CBO, LEED AP, CASp
Principal Project Manager – Willdan Engineering

While performing inspections on a new dwelling, I had a contractor ask me if water hammer arresters were required on certain water supply connections at some appliances. Water hammer arresters are intended to prevent the vibrations created in a water supply line when the water is suddenly shut-off (which is typical for some automatic type valves – such as in washing machines, ice makers, etc.). Water hammer is that sound you hear when moving water is suddenly stopped by the rapid closing of a valve. The force of the water is transferred instantly from the water into the pipe, and then into the fixtures or framing of your home.

Before answering the contractor’s question, I pulled out my 2013 California Plumbing Code and turned to Section 609.10, which reads as follows:

609.10 Water Hammer. [Not adopted by HCD] Building water supply systems where quick-acting valves are installed shall be provided with water hammer arrester(s) to absorb high pressures resulting from the quick closing of these valves. Water hammer arresters shall be approved mechanical devices in accordance with the applicable standard(s) referenced in Table 1401.1 and shall be installed as close as possible to quick-acting valves.

water hammer arrester

The confusing part is where the Code reads “Not adopted by HCD”. So the question in my mind was; If HCD has authority over building standards applicable to dwellings in California, and they did not adopt Section 609.10, can the local Building Inspector require the installation of water hammer arresters?

I decided to contact the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and ask the question. Their answer was that water hammer arresters are not required by the current California Plumbing Code for residential buildings under HCD authority, unless the jurisdiction has adopted a local ordinance which specifically applies Section 609.10 to dwellings, or a local plumbing code requirement for water hammer arrestors has been adopted.

HCD staff went on to explain that if the Matrix Adoption Tables shows that the state agency with regulatory jurisdiction over the building occupancy, feature or equipment, has not adopted a code section, then it will not be applicable or enforceable on those occupancies. State law allows local government to enact local ordinances with more restrictive building standards because of local climatic, geological, or topographic conditions as long as those code amendments are properly filed with the appropriate State agencies. Legally filed local amendments to Title 24 can be viewed on the California Building Standards Commission Local Code Ordinances webpage.

CASp Regulation Amendments Became Effective on May 9

Wheelchair elevator access

The Division of the State Architect (DSA) modified the existing regulations to further clarify rules and procedures for the Certified Access Specialist (CASp) program. These modified regulations were approved by the Office of Administrative Law, with an effective date of May 9, 2016.

Statutory Changes

SB 269 establishes a new 120-day grace period for businesses with 50 or fewer employees if the business owner, following a CASp inspection, corrects all violations noted in the CASp report within 120 days of the date of inspection. During this time, the business is not liable for minimum statutory damages for related claims. Effective immediately, for a business or facility owner who commits to achieving compliance within 120 days of the CASp inspection, the CASp must meet the following requirements:

On the day of the CASp inspection, the CASp must post notice, a form prescribed by the State Architect, in a conspicuous location within five feet of all public entrances to the buildings inspected. It is the CASp’s responsibility to instruct the business owner to keep the notice posted on the building for 120 days, or until all of the construction-related violations in the area inspected by the CASp are corrected, whichever occurs first. Although SB 269 grants DSA until January 1, 2017 to develop the notice form, we will make a notice form available and will notify you of its availability in the near future to facilitate compliance with the notice requirements.

Within the first 10 days after the CASp inspection, the CASp must file a copy of the notice described above with DSA for online publication. The notice must indicate that the CASp has inspected the business, the name and address of the business, the date of the inspection, the CASp’s name and license number, the date of the notice filing, and a description of the structure or area inspected by the CASp (interior, exterior, or both interior and exterior of the premises).

Within 30 days of the CASp inspection, the CASp must provide a written CASp inspection report to the business owner. Please note that this requirement only applies to businesses that qualify for the 120-day grace period and commit on the day of inspection to achieving compliance with applicable standards.

Effective immediately, SB 269 requires all CASps to provide DSA with the name of the city, county, or city and county in which they provide inspection services. DSA is required to post this information online. CASps must provide this information on the “Update Your Contact Information” page for their CASp Account.

Additionally, effective immediately, CASp inspection reports indicating that corrections are needed for the site to meet all applicable construction-related accessibility standards must include the date of the inspection.

SB 269 also requires CASps to provide DSA a list of all businesses inspected on or after January 1, 2017, including the inspection date. DSA will develop a process for the collection of this information and will issue further instructions for compliance with this provision before January 1, 2017.

For questions regarding SB 269 requirements, please contact CASProgram@dgs.ca.gov.

Regulatory Changes

A strikeout-and-underline version of the adopted regulations, the Final Statement of Reasons, and updated versions of the Best Practices Manual and the CASp Examination, Certification, and Practice Handbook are available on the Voluntary Certified Access Specialist Program webpage.

CASP manual cover

Current CASps should particularly take note of the following changes:

New Continuing Education Requirements. CASps requesting recertification are required to complete 15 continuing education units (CEUs) during each three-year certification period. Under the new regulations, at least five of the continuing education units must address regulatory updates to the accessibility provisions of the California Building Code. In order to facilitate compliance with this change, DSA will provide a grace period for enforcement of this provision. CASps submitting certification renewal information on or after January 1, 2017 must demonstrate compliance with this provision.

New Submission of Records Requirement. CASps requesting recertification must submit a record of all disability inspection certificates issued to the CASp, which includes the number of the certificate and the name and address of the facility inspected. The record should indicate a status of "VOID" for any certificates voided by the CASp, and "UNISSUED" for any certificates that have not yet been issued. Any information pertaining to the determination of the facility as “CASp-inspected” or “meets applicable standards" must be redacted prior to submittal to DSA.

New Delinquency Fee. Under the new regulations, an expired certification may be reinstated within the first year after expiration, provided that the holder meets all certification renewal requirements and pays a $150 delinquency fee in addition to certification renewal fees. This new process replaces the previous practice that allowed CASps to petition for an extension of time to complete certification renewal requirements prior to certification expiration. DSA will no longer offer time extensions to complete certification renewal. Therefore, CASps must complete the certification renewal process, including payment of fees, and must receive confirmation of successful certification renewal from DSA prior to certification expiration, or they must reinstate expired certification through the new delinquency process.

New Professional Standards. New regulations establish professional standards for the CASp, which require a written agreement prior to performing CASp services, and establish the significance of the CASp signature on an inspection report or inspection record when signature is required by statute.

New Grounds for Disciplinary Action. New regulations establish grounds for disciplinary action against the CASp, and delineate the notification and appeals process for disciplinary actions.

For questions regarding certification renewal, please contact Andrew Deller by email at andrew.deller@dgs.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 327-5410. For all other questions regarding CASp regulatory changes, please contact Ida Clair by email at ida.clair@dgs.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 322-2490.

yellow bumps

Another State Mandate to Expedite Plan Check – This time for CASp related Projects

In addition to the above noted changes to the CASp regulations, Senate Bill 269 also mandated that certain CASp related plan check submittals be reviewed on an expedited basis. The following excerpts describe the latest expedited plan check mandate:

Article 4. Expedited Review
65946.
(a) For the purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Certified access specialist” or “CASp” means any person who has been certified pursuant to Section 4459.5.
(2) “Construction-related accessibility standard” means a provision, standard, or regulation under state or federal law requiring compliance with standards for making new construction and existing facilities accessible to persons with disabilities, including, but not limited to, any provision, standard, or regulation set forth in Section 51, 54, 54.1, or 55 of the Civil Code, Section 19955.5 of the Health and Safety Code, the California Building Standards Code (Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations), the federal Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-336; 42 U.S.C. Sec. 12101 et seq.), and the federal Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (Appendix A to Part 36 of Title 28 of the Code of Federal Regulations).
(3) “Written inspection report” means the CASp report required to be provided pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 55.53 of the Civil Code.
(b) A local agency shall expedite review of a project application if the project applicant meets all of the following conditions:
(1) The applicant provides a copy of a disability access inspection certificate, provided by a CASp pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 55.53 of the Civil Code, pertaining to the site of the proposed project.
(2) The applicant demonstrates that the proposed project is necessary to address either an alleged violation of a construction-related accessibility standard or a violation noted in a written inspection report.
(3) If project plans are necessary for the approval of a project, the applicant has had a CASp review the project plans for compliance with all applicable construction-related accessibility standards.

LEGISLATIVE REVIEW

For a list of legislative actions which may have an impact on local building departments, visit the CALBO Legislative Watch page.

senate desks

UPCOMING CALBO Training Events

2016 CALBO Education Week: North

Monday, September 12 -
Thursday, September 15, 2016

San Ramon Marriott
2600 Bishop Drive
San Ramon, CA 94583

Register by: Wednesday, August 31, 2016

2016 CALBO Education Week: South

Monday, October 24 -
Thursday, October 27, 2016

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Ontario Airport
222 North Vineyard Avenue
Ontario, CA 91764

Register by: Tuesday, October 11, 2016

2016 CALBO Education Week: Orange County

Monday, November 7 -
Thursday, November 10, 2016

Anaheim Marriott
700 Convention Center Way
Anaheim, CA 92801

Register by: Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Questions about the 2016 CALBO Education Weeks?

Contact CALBO at 916-457-1103 or info@calbo.org.